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Discover, explore & remember the traditions of Newfoundland’s Cape Shore.

Explore the
Cape Shore

Listen to songs, music & stories. View photos of the people & places. Meet the singers & musicians from Ship Cove, Patrick’s Cove, St Bride’s, and Branch. This interactive map of the Cape Shore is a great way to start navigating your way around the outports of this short stretch of Newfoundland’s coastline.

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Placentia

See items related to Lears Cove

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Ship's Cove

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Patrick's Cove

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St. Bride's

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Cape St. Mary's

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Branch

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Discover & Explore

The mountains of Mourne

Frankie Nash & Stephanie Nash

The mountains of Mourne / Frankie Nash & Stephanie Nash

The mountains of Mourne, song (Oh Mary this London's a wonderful sight ...) William Percy French (1854–1920) of Co. Roscommon wrote the lyrics to this song around 1896 on a postcard that he then sent to music-hall composer William Houston Collison. The song tells the story of an Irishman working away from home in London, recounting both the strange things he sees and his longing to be home. Newfoundland song scholar Anna Kearney Guigné writes: “The song’s mass appeal may be attributed more to modern media than tradition. The song was popularized by the Australian tenor Peter Dawson (1882–1961)” (2016:274). Dawson’s recordings apparently were in circulation in at least some Newfoundland localities.  To commemorate the 40th anniversary of Frankie Nash’s passing, his granddaughter, Stephanie Nash, used a field recording of Frankie singing “The Mountains of Mourne” in his kitchen as the basis of her version of the song. Her version, recorded in 2016, overdubs the original field recording.

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Transcript of 'Lonely Banna strand' as sung by Frankie Nash / Aidan O'Hara

Lonely Banna strand, song (Being on a Friday morning all in the month of May …) A typed transcript based on Aidan O'Hara's field recording, with annotations and corrections by the collector.

This is east

Frankie Nash

This is east / Frankie Nash

This is east, song (This east and this west; soon I’ll learn to say the rest …) This short children’s song is told from the perspective of a ten-year-old, bragging about all of the things he’s learned.  Frankie Nash learned this song for a school concert when he was only ten years old. He claimed that Aidan O’Hara was the first person outside of Branch to hear it.

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Transcript of a conversation about the places in Ireland from which Caroline Brennan's family emigrated / Caroline Brennan ; Aidan O'Hara

A typed transcript of a conversation between Aidan O'Hara and Caroline Brennan. Caroline Brennan describes the places from which her family emigrated, including Carrick-on-Suir, Waterford, Fiddown, and Mooncoin.

Patsy Judge on stage at the 1978 Folk Festival / Len Penton, photographer

Patsy Judge on stage at the 1978 Folk Festival / Len Penton, photographer

Patsy Judge playing the whistle on stage at the Second Annual Newfoundland Folk Festival in Bannerman Park, St John's, Newfoundland.

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